Hillview Exotics

Barnyard to Ornamental birds and much more...

Waterfowl

Ornamental Ducks

Call Ducks

The Call Duck is a small breed of domesticated duck raised primarily for decoration or as pets. Energetic and active, they have a plump bowl-shaped body; a wide, rounded head; tiny, broad bill and short legs. It is vocal with a high pitched call and come in a variety of standard colours including White, White-Bibbed Blue, White-Bibbed Black, Pastel, Silver, Snowy, Khaki, and Black East Indie. They can produce 25–75 eggs a year.

Our Calls come in Black East India, Butterscotch, Dalmation, Gray, Khaki, pastel, Snowy, White, White Bibbed-Black and White Bibbed-Blue.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Indian Runner Ducks

Runners have a long history going back nearly 2000 years ago. Their high egg production and unique appearance, they are also known as "Indian Runner”, with its slim body and long neck. The head is slender with eyes set high, the bill is straight, and the legs are set far back on their bodies, resulting in the upright carriage characteristic of the breed. There are more color types of Runner ducks than any other breed of duck. Runners come in color varieties.

Runner ducks are prolific layers and can lay well in excess of 200 white, hen-sized eggs per year. The most active forager of all breeds, they will cover a large area in search of snails, slugs, insects, and other edibles. While not capable of sustained flight, Runners can scramble over a two to three foot enclosure for food. Runners make excellent show birds and are entertaining pets, wonderful pest controllers and fine layers. Consider this breed as an addition to your flock.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Medium Weight Ducks

Khaki Campbell

Developed in England by crossing a Fawn and White Indian Runner with a Rouen to create offspring that would lay well and have bigger bodies, the first Campbell’s resembled Mallards. Further crossing to create a buff duck (a fad at this time), back to Penciled Runner ducks created today’s "Khaki Campbell."

The Campbell duck is a medium sized bird that are active, streamlined birds with a modestly long head, bill, neck, and body, and a sprightly body carriage. There is four color varieties of Campbell ducks. The Khaki drake has a green bill, rich dark orange legs and feet, and dark brown eyes. Its head, upper neck, lower back, and tail culverts are brown-bronze while the rest of the drake's plumage is a warm khaki. The hen has a green bill and dark brown eyes and its legs and feet are brown. The ducks head, upper neck, and lower back are seal-brown and the rest of the plumage is khaki.

Campbell’s their first eggs when 5-7 months old and will average 250-340 eggs of superb texture and flavor per year. Compels are high-strung and energetic, and need plenty of space to graze and forage. Amazingly adaptable, they have taken to nearly all environments. Consider this adaptable, excellent layer for a lovely and useful addition to your flock.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Mallard

The Mallard is the best-known and most recognizable of all ducks. It is a dabbling duck throughout the North Hemisphere. It is strongly migratory and winters south. The Mallard and the Muscovy Duck are believed to be the ancestors of all domestic ducks.

The male is unmistakable, with a green head, black rear end and a yellowish orange bill tipped with black. The female Mallard is light brown, like most female dabbling ducks. However, both the female and male Mallards have distinct purple speculum edged with white, prominent in flight or at rest. In eclipse plumage the drake becomes drab, looking more like the female, but still distinguishable by its yellow bill and reddish breast.

Mallard’s also come in white, a natural color mutation and also Snowy which look exactly like their call counterparts. The male has a nasal call, the female the "quack" always associated with ducks.

Clutches consist of 8 to 13 eggs and are incubated for about 26 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Muscovy

The Muscovy Duck is a large perching duck which is native to Mexico, Central and South America they often roost in trees at night.

Muscovy come in a variety of colors usually with a white head. Many breeders will also have Muscovy that are nearly if not completely one color. Characteristics of this breed include long talons on its feet and a wide flat tail. Their most distinctive features are a bare red face with a pronounced caruncle at the base of the bill and a low erectile crest of feathers. The drake has a dry hissing call, and the hen a quiet trilling coo.

This species does not form stable pairs. The hen lays a clutch of 8-10 white eggs, usually in a tree hole or hollow, which are incubated for 35 days. They are the longest incubation period of all the ducks. The Domestic Muscovy duck is descended from the wild Muscovy Duck.

As Muscovy Ducks lay large clutches and can be encouraged to produce up to three clutches of offspring a year. Muscovy Ducks cannot be crossed with the domestic duck in captivity to produce hybrids. The offspring are known as Mule Duck because they are sterile.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Geese

Buff American

The American Buff goose was developed in North America and is descended from the wild Graylag goose. The American Buff is a lovely apricot-fawn color. The buff colored feathers on its back and sides are edged with creamy white..... Its abdomen is nearly white. Its bill and feet are orange to reddish orange, and the hard "nail" at the tip of the bill is a pale pink and has brown eyes.

The breed is the largest of the medium weight class of geese. It has a medium-long neck with deeply furrowed feathers. It has a chunky body with little or no evidence of a keel, a slightly arched back, and two rounded fatty lobes on the abdomen. The tail is held in line with or only slightly above the line of the back. This sturdy body is set on moderately sized legs that are set suitably far apart to provide a stable base.

The American Buff goose is calm and docile. They are good parents, attending well to their goslings. These attributes make it well suited for the average home flock. Its colored plumage does not soil as readily as that of white birds.

Hens can lay up to 160 eggs per year, eggs are incubated for about 28 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Chinese

Chinese geese are considered to be the most graceful and beautiful member of the goose family. Sometimes referred to as "Swan Geese" they descend from the wild swan goose native to Asia.

Producing nearly twice as many goslings as other geese, laying 40 - 100 white eggs annually. Alert and vocal, they will raise the alarm if a threat is perceived. By far the most popular breed for weeding chores due to their active foraging habits, moderate size, unmatched agility, good availability and reasonable prices when properly managed.

Its bill is relatively long and slender, with a large, rounded, erect knob that attaches to its forehead. The Chinese holds its head high and flows seamlessly into a long, slim, well-arched neck. Its body is short, compact, has a prominent and well-rounded chest, smooth breast and no keel. Its abdomen is moderately full but has no fatty lobes, except during the laying season when the female may develop a single lobe. Heavier than it appears, because its feathers are closely fitted, it is a hardy breed. Their knobs will freeze when temperatures fall below -20 degrees F. It is important to provide the flock some protection during freezing weather.

There are two color varieties of Chinese geese, brown and white. The original variety is a rich brown and fawn, accented by a dark, russet-brown neck stripe. In mature birds, the glossy black bill and knob are separated from the main head plumage by a narrow band of creamy-white feathers. The shanks and feet are brownish orange or dark orange and the eyes brown. The white variety has blue eyes, pure white plumage, and bright orange feet, knobs and bills. For those looking for "watchdogs" Chinese are an excellent choice for the home flock.

Hens can lay up to 160 eggs per year, eggs are incubated for about 28 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Dewlap

The Dewlap Toulouse is a huge moderate egg-layer averaging 20-35 eggs yearly.... Some specimens tip the scales at thirty pounds or more. They often appear heavier than they actually are.

Every feature of this placid giant is massive. The bill is stout, the head large and broad, and the moderately long neck is thick and nearly straight. Often suspended from the lower bill and upper neck is a heavy, folded dewlap that increases in size and fullness with age. The body is long, broad and deep, ending in a well-spread tail that points up slightly. They have a rounded breast, and often exhibit a wide keel.

Even when not confined, these massive birds do not wander far from their food and water. Additional calcium provided to support development of their large frame.

During the breeding season it is extremely important that producing birds are not overweight, but they do need an adequate supply of concentrated feed that is 18 to 22 percent crude protein. Fertility is highest when birds get sufficient exercise, access to succulent green feeds, and water for swimming. Hens can lay upto 160 eggs per year, eggs are incubated for about 28 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Embden

The Embden Goose is a breed of domestic goose. The origins of this breed are thought to be from region of the North Sea, in Holland and Germany. In German the breed is known as Emder Gans or Emdener Gans.

The breed is pure white with a short, light orange bill, and orange feet and shanks. They are fast growing birds and will quickly reach about 20 lbs for the Goose, and 30 lbs for the Gander. The Embden's legs are fairly short. The head is oval-shaped and they have a long and graceful neck. The eyes are an ocean blue. The body is bulky and well rounded, having a long back and a short tail. The wings are very strong and of a good length. The feathers are close and very hard. The breed’s habits are to forage for tidbits in the grass and water, a very hardy breed. The adult bird will commence laying eggs fairly early in the year, in February as a rule, laying 30 to 40 eggs.

For Price and Availability Click here



Top of Page

Pilgram

Pilgrim Geese are a breed of domestic goose. The origins of this breed are unclear, but they are thought to be either descended from stock in Europe, or developed from American stock during the Great Depression era.

The breed is auto-sexing with distinct color differences between males (ganders) and females (geese) at hatching. Newly hatched ganders are light yellow and geese are grey. Adult Ganders are mostly white with some grey on the rump and occasionally with traces of grey on other parts of their bodies. Adult Geese are mostly grey and occasionally have traces of grey in their faces. Both Ganders and geese have a knobless orange bill, and orange feet and shanks. Weight of the mature bird is about 13-14 pounds.

This breed of goose is listed as critical by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Pomeranian

The Pomeranian Goose also known as the Rügener Goose, is a breed of domestic goose. This fowl was developed by Northern German farmers of Pomerania as early as 1500.

The Pomeranian is the only descendant of the Greylag Goose specifically bred for a single-lobed paunch. Pomeranian Geese average 16 pounds in weight and lay about 70 eggs a season. They have flattened heads, stout necks, prominent breasts, rounded bodies. They make good watch birds as they tend to greet visitors.

Pomeranian Geese usually have white feathers around the base of their bills but solid-colored heads are more preferred. A Pomeranian Goose should have blue eyes, a pinkish red bill, and reddish orange legs and feet.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Sebaspotal

The Sebastopol goose originated in southeastern Europe to the region around the Black Sea and named after Sebastopol, a Russian city from which they were imported. It was developed from the wild Graylag goose that is native to Europe.

Readily identified by their feathers, the feathers are long, soft-quilled, curling and draping elegantly from the wings, body and tail. This goose is an excellent example of breeding for a specific trait. The white variety of the Sebastopol is best known. The pure white feathers contrast with their bright blue eyes, orange bills and feet. There are also gray and buff color varieties.

Medium-sized geese, they have large, rounded heads, prominent eyes, slightly arched necks, keelless breasts and dual lobes. The plumage of the head and upper two-thirds of the neck is normal, while that of the breast and underbody is elongated and well curled. The soft, fluffy feathers of the back, wings and tail have flexible shafts, are attractively spiraled. The curled feathers prevent flight. Sebastopol’s produce 25-35 eggs annually. When handled carefully, they have a quiet and pleasant nature.

Clean water for swimming should be made available. They are hardy and raised successfully in cold climates however their loose fitting feathers do not provide as much warmth, nor shed water as well.

Hens can lay up to 160 eggs per year, eggs are incubated for about 28 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page

Toulouse

The name Toulouse is used for several types of gray geese descended from the European Graylag. The Standard Dewlap Toulouse is a massively boned bird, bred for ability to gain weight rapidly.

Toulouse are large moderate egg-laying averaging 25-40 eggs per year. Suitable for the home or small farm flock, their popularity comes from their availability, general practicality, and to some, aesthetic quality. Production Toulouse are the best layers among the heavyweight breeds.

Toulouse have large, oval heads; moderately long, heavy necks; and thick, wide bodies. Like all breeds descended from the wild Graylag, the feathers on the sides of the neck are deeply furrowed. Gray is their primary color...... Their abdomen is off-white. Lighter markings traverse the dark sides and back giving an attractive laced effect. They have an orange bill and reddish orange legs. Their dark feathers provide good camouflage.

Hens can lay up to 160 eggs per year, eggs are incubated for about 28 days.

For Price and Availability Click here


Top of Page